Pricing risk to the environment works best when it’s fair

Pollution

Our latest report Responsible Risk explains how putting a price on risk to the environment can make disasters less likely. The report shows how we can use economic tools to strengthen companies’ incentives to manage environmental risks posed by their operations. In this blog, I’ll discuss why when it comes to risk pricing, one size […]

A missing piece in the oil transport debate

Climate and Energy

Concerns about the environmental risks from oil transport are a key aspect of the debates about energy infrastructure in Canada. Pipelines pose risks of spills and so do tankers. At the same time, the recent five-year anniversary of the tragic Lac-Mégantic derailment reminded us of the risks that come with transport by rail. Our new […]

Photo of 417 highway in Ottawa for Paved Paradise: Could congestion pricing work in Ottawa?

Paved Paradise: Could congestion pricing work in Ottawa?

Livable Cities Pollution

Two weeks ago, the Healthy Transportation Coalition (HTC) held a forum at the University of Ottawa. The subject: congestion pricing in our nation’s capital. The HTC hosted six expert speakers for a lively debate (including our research team’s fearless leader, Dale Beugin). The same day, four Ottawa city councillors released a new report on congestion […]

Advancing the climate debate in Canada - Chris Ragan CIGI talk -blog and video about provincial carbon pricing

Advancing the climate debate in Canada

Climate and Energy

The following is a cross-posted blog from cigionline.org by Erin Baxter, Public Affairs Coordinator and Kevin Dias, Communications Specialist. We can have our cake and eat it too, said Chris Ragan, Canadian economist and chair of Canada’s Ecofiscal Commission. Speaking at CIGI as part of the Signature Lecture Series, Ragan discussed a radically practical approach […]

provincial carbon pricing - Canada

The inside scoop on our new report

Climate and Energy

The question is not if Canada needs to lower greenhouse gas emissions, but rather when and how. The answer is now—through provincial carbon pricing. You can almost hear it. The loud crack of a middle ground erupting, cutting through the din of Canada’s polarized economy-versus-environment debate on climate change. What’s brought it to the surface? A broadening agreement among Canadians that “doing nothing” […]

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