Self-driving cars: A techno-utopia or an eco-nightmare?

Climate and Energy Livable Cities Pollution Technology and Innovation

by Simon Altman Elon Musk recently announced that Tesla will have a fully autonomous car ready by 2020, and Tesla is not alone. As this technology moves from dream to reality, some have started to discuss the opportunities it will present, while others are stuck dwelling on the risks. In this blog we explore these […]

Mobility pricing - Metro Vancouver - Congestion Pricing

How should road congestion in Metro Vancouver be priced?

Livable Cities

If you ever find yourself at a random party in Metro Vancouver and are struggling to make conversation, asking about the region’s traffic woes is a guaranteed ticket for a lively debate. Metro Vancouver has some of the worst traffic in Canada, and is intensifying with the region’s rapid population growth and confined geography. The […]

QEW HOT Lane Pilot Project

Outstanding questions on Ontario’s proposed QEW pilot project

Livable Cities

In our recent blog on Ontario’s coming HOT lane pilot project, we congratulated Ontario on moving forward on congestion pricing policy. However, a few specific issues with the proposed Queen Elizabeth Way (QEW) pilot project remain. First, using a monthly permit approach can limit the effectiveness of policy and increase costs. It can also reduce […]

Ontario HOT lane pilot project - congestion pricing

Ontario’s Coming HOT Lane Pilot Project

Livable Cities

Late last year, Ontario announced the details of two high-occupancy toll (HOT) lane projects as a means to improve traffic flow in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA). The Province will start by implementing a HOT lane—a hybrid of a tolled road and a high-occupancy vehicle (HOV) lane—as a pilot project on a busy stretch of […]

Congestion pricing - Montreal, Quebec

Getting traffic moving in Montreal

Livable Cities

On November 2nd, the Ecofiscal Commission launched its latest report We Can’t Get There from Here: Why Pricing Congestion is Critical to Beating It. The report explains how we can’t simply build our way out of congestion; we also need to consider incentives. The report’s central recommendation is that Canada’s four largest cities run congestion […]

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